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Clinical Phytoscience

International Journal of Phytomedicine and Phytotherapy

Clinical Phytoscience Cover Image
  • Correction
  • Open Access

Correction to: Phytochemical studies, antiangiogenic, antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities of Scyphocephalium ochocoa Warb. (Myristicaceae), medicinal plant from Gabon

  • Rick-Leonid Ngoua-Meye-Misso1, 2, 5Email author,
  • Jean De La Croix Ndong3,
  • Cédric Sima-Obiang1, 2,
  • Joseph Privat Ondo1, 2,
  • Guy Roger Ndong-Atome1, 2,
  • Felix Ovono Abessolo4 and
  • Louis-Clément Obame-Engonga1, 2
Clinical PhytoscienceInternational Journal of Phytomedicine and Phytotherapy20184:19

https://doi.org/10.1186/s40816-018-0078-7

Received: 14 June 2018

Accepted: 18 June 2018

Published: 2 July 2018

The original article was published in Clinical Phytoscience 2018 4:15

Correction

Following the publication of this article [1], the authors noticed that Figs. 1, 2 and 3 were in the incorrect order and thus had incorrect captions. The images that were incorrectly published as Figs. 1, 2 and 3 should have been published as Figs. 2, 3 and 1 respectively.
Figure 1
Fig. 1

Shrub and trunk of S. ochocoa. Photos taken at Mitzic, Woleu-Ntem (Nothern of Gabon) by Ngoua-Meye-Misso with digital camera Cannon 16 M pixel made in China

Figure 2
Fig. 2

Inhibitory effects of water extracts of plants on angiogenesis. The CAM of a 8 days old chick embryo was separately exposed to PBS (control). Extracts were introduced on top of the CAMs. After 48 h of incubation, the CAM tissue directly beneath each filter disk was resected, and digital images of the CAM sections were captured

Figure 3
Fig. 3

Haemoglobin content of CAM sections detected by Drabkin’s assay. The hemoglobin content in the CAM sections was determined by Drabkin method. As in the case of macroscopic observation of CAM that showed that the number of blood vessel branches was concentration dependent, so the present figure shows a hemoglobin content dependent on the concentration of S. Ochocoa water extract and sorafenib

The correct versions of Figs. 1, 2 and 3 with captions have been included in this Correction.

The original article has been corrected.

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Laboratory of Research in Biochemistry (LAREBIO), University of Sciences and Technology of Masuku, Franceville, Gabon
(2)
Laboratory of Natural Substances and Organometallic Synthesis, University of Sciences and Technology of Masuku, Franceville, Gabon
(3)
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat Laboratory, Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, USA
(4)
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Joint Unit of Biomedical Research, University of Health Sciences, Libreville, Gabon
(5)
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Science and Technology of Masuku, Franceville, Gabon

Reference

  1. Ngoua-Meye-Misso et al. Clinical Phytoscience. 2018;4:15. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40816-018-0075-x.View ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s). 2018

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